Mathilde HK at the Hong Kong Museum of History – Treasures from Tsarskoye Selo, Residence of the Russian Monarchs.

You are curious about XIX th century history?

You want to travel to Russia?

The tragic end of the Romanov Dynasty moved you?

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Tsarskoye Selo

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Four-seater carriage used for the coronation of Emperor Alexander II in Moscow, 1856.
©The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve, St. Petersburg, 2014

Until March 16 2015, the Hong Kong Museum of History houses an amazing set of 200 objects from Russia, loans from the Tsraskoye Selo National Museum in St. Petersburg. Treasures from Tsarskoye Selo, Residence of the Russian Monarchs is an exhibition dedicated to the three last tzars of the Romanov Dynasty. Personal Objects, Portraits, Weapons, Imperial Artifacts, Ceremonial Clothing and Gowns,  pieces from the Imperial Collections, China Wares and Lacquers, Hard Stones,  Lithographs, Photographs and Engravings are bringing the Imperial palaces back to life.The exhibition is part of the Russian festival launched in Hong Kong from October 2014 to March 2015. For that first Edition, the public can enjoy a real Russian season with Operas, Ballets, Piano recitals, Art Exhibitions and Performances. The Bolshoi will event perform different ballets.

The  setting of the Romanov exhibition is really ambitious. The Hong Kong Museum of History recreated the golden blue walls of the palaces. Red rugs and reproductions of imperial decors allow the public to travel through time. A dozen of rooms display the collections according to a thematic order: Coronation ceremonies and Souvenir dishes, the raise of St. Petersburg: Peter the Great and Catherine II, Ceremonial dresses and Uniforms, the building of Tsarskoye Selo, the Chinese Art collections, the Imperial Porcelains, Destruction and Restoration of Tsarskoye Selo

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Portrait of the last Russian empress, Alexandra, at Tsarskoye Selo, 1907.
©The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve, St. Petersburg, 2014

As a Porcelain collector and amateur, I really appreciated the showcase of Chinese and European Porcelains. The Imperial collections started to display Asian Art quite early on, in the XVIII th century, under the reign of Catherine II.The Chinese Pavillon was called Great Caprice at that time. Tsarskoye Selo included within its halls a Chinese Hall and a Museum of Asian Art. Unfortunately, the original Chinese decorations of the palace were destroyed during WWII by the Germans and the only traces that remained were the aquarelles made by the Italian Architect in charge of the Palaces in the XIX th century: Premazzi (1814-1891).

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Chinese lacquer vase presented by China’s last emperor Puyi to Russia’s last emperor Nicholas II, 1909.
©The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve, St. Petersburg, 2014

Don’t miss that first quality exhibition worth going to!

The Hong Kong Jockey Club Series:

“Treasures from Tsarskoye Selo, Residence of the Russian Monarchs” Exhibition

29/10/2014 – 16/3/2015

Admission  Fee
Standard: HK$20
Concession:HK$10 (for people with disabilities (and one accompanying minder), full time students and senior citizens aged 60 or above)
Group (20 persons or above):HK$14
Holders of Museum Pass enjoy free admission
* Free admission on Wednesdays is not applicable to this exhibition

Venue
Special Exhibition Gallery, Hong Kong Museum of History

Jointly presented by 
The Leisure and Cultural Services Department
The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve, Russia

Solely sponsored by
The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust

Jointly organised by
The Hong Kong Museum of History
The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve, Russia

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